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Channeling Freddie Mercury

Posted by Andrew Eblen on November 6, 2018 at 12:30 AM

Since this new theme is dedicated to music I felt I would share an article that I found recently. Freddie Mercury is one of my favourite singers and I think it's great getting to hear his words from beyond the veil. 


Part 1

And now, Mr. Freddie Mercury:


Me: Erik, let’s see if we can get Freddie Mercury for us. Jamie and I are big Queen fans.


Jamie: Oh, Erik just left. He didn’t even say anything.


(Pause)


Jamie: And here he is. Mr. Freddie Mercury. He’s got his moustache!


Me: Oh good! Hello Mr. Mercury!


Mercury: Hello ladies.


Me: We’re friend. I mean fans—and friends, of course. You were—and are—so incredible. Such power from the heart when you sing. I just don’t know how to describe it.


Jamie: He says thank you very much, but does he have a lisp?


Me: A little bit of a lisp, yeah. He did.


Jamie: Huh. Really? I never heard it, but of course I guess you don’t really have a lisp when you sing.


Me: Yes, isn’t that something? The same thing with stuttering.


Jamie: All right. Sorry. Go ahead.


Me: Okay, what beliefs did you have about death and the afterlife while you were alive? What did you think was going to happen?


Freddie: I thought that you would die, and the gods would come for you. Then, they would judge you on the life that you lived and that would determine how well you lived in the afterlife.


Me: Really? How interesting. What kind of religion is that?


Freddie (laughing): I think it’s a bit of my own!


Me: Wow, not too many people create their own religion, Freddie!


Freddie: Where I grew up—


Jamie: It’s weird. It’s kind of like Catholic, but not in a Catholic place. Let’s see if that makes sense. Can you explain that to me, Freddie?


(Freddie gives details to Jamie)


Jamie: In a different country? So he says he was raised Catholic, but in a country that was not Catholic in itself. So he heard multiple viewpoints on religion as a young boy and kind of put together the two, because when he was younger, he said anyone who could give me multiple viewpoints on the same topic just proved to him that nobody really understood it.


Me: Ah!


Freddie: So, I just threaded together what I liked about all of them. I guess that was for my own comfort, because I didn’t believe in what the school was teaching.


Me: After you passed over, how did your beliefs change?

 

Freddie: That didn’t happen at all!


Jamie giggles.


Me: Surprise!


Freddie: Thankfully, I wasn’t judged for who I was. If I had been, I clearly would have defended myself. I felt that I lived a life that most people wanted, because I did what I fell in love with. It didn’t matter if it was proper or improper, if it was boys or girls, I did what my desires led me to do.


Jamie: He laughs. He kind of recants his words.


Freddie: There was a good sized portion of my life where I was very selfish. As you know, when I became ill, that part I also did all that I desired, but it wasn’t selfish. It was very unselfish. I know you’re going to ask me what did I learn; that is what I learned how to do.


Me: Oh, okay. Now, what was your actual transition to heaven like for you?


Freddie: I believe I smiled.


Me: Aw.


Freddie: I was in my room. I remember there was never a quiet moment. You could always hear the people outside.


Jamie: Oh, you had people outside?


Freddie: Yes, sometimes I would have someone hold up a mirror so that I could see out the window and down.


Jamie: He must have been on a hill or up in a second story room. It’s not clear, but he looks like he’s up higher. He wanted the mirror to held in a way that he could see what was happening.


Freddie: I always felt loved by the people who enjoyed my music. I never felt like I was being stripped or robbed of my creative expression.


Me: Aw, that’s good! So your death wasn’t very painful? It was peaceful, then? Like a release? Is that what you’re trying to say?


Freddie: Well, the medications helped. I think without that, it would have been very painful, and my body—I was never once afraid. I knew it was coming; I welcomed it. I had been sick for a very long time, and I just wanted death to come rescue me.


What a poignant and spiritual song. One of my favorites:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5L8-FTvSVxs


And now, part two of our interview with Mr. Mercury.


Me: Can you describe your thoughts when you realized you had crossed over?


Freddie: You know, I really did ask, ‘Where the hell are the bloody angels!’ I said it really boisterously.


Jamie, Erik and I laugh hard. We could just hear him.


Freddie: And what followed soon after was laughter. I knew then that I had the right heaven, that I hadn’t gone to hell.


Jamie and I laugh.

 

Freddie: My family was there. It was a white room with no walls, but I knew it was a room. I knew I was contained somehow.


(Pause)


Jamie (sounding a bit choked up): Aw, the emotions that come across are way heavier than the words themselves.

 

Freddie: I took a moment to release; I took a moment to cry.


Jamie: The energy that comes out of him kind of chokes me up a little bit. That’s how much he was looking forward just to die.

 

Freddie: Yeah, my body ate me alive.


Me: Oh, what an awful disease. Well, was it your destiny to die when and how you did? If so, why?


Freddie: I believe it was. You know, I don’t think I would have been happier growing old and not being able to perform. I only wanted that life on the stage, and I got that right up until the end.


Me: Were you meant to die from that particular disease?


Freddie: I think it was very selfless of me to follow through with this. It wasn’t until my death that this disease really got mapped, got noticed.


Me: So you were meant to bring AIDS awareness and understanding to the world?


Freddie: Yes.


Me: Was that meant on a different level than for your own personal reasons? Was it also to teach us about compassion and acceptance toward groups of people who are often targeted and maligned and who often bear the brunt of fear-based emotions and thoughts?

 

Freddie: Absolutely. A lot of people like to categorize me as a gay man. I think I appropriately fit the category of a man who loved whomever was best for me—male or female. Bisexual doesn’t do it do it justice, because there was nothing in me that was divided that way.


Me: Interesting.


Jamie (laughing): He likes to call it “all sexual”!


Me: There we go, and all sexual man! So, can you describe your afterlife now? What do you do there? Do you have a life’s work? What does it look like? You know the drill.


Freddie: I have a place to come home to, but I rarely find myself doing so. Most of my passion is devoted to working with artists who are still living who find an inspiration in me, and I help them with the writing of the music, the singing of the music, the expression. I feel a bit like everyone’s mother in the fact that I want to keep them out of the limelight’s harm.


Me: Oh, yeah. Did you gain any new insights once you were in the afterlife?

 

Freddie: I gained that what I wanted to believe about heaven while I was on earth actually exists.


Me: Anything else.


Freddie (chuckling): I think that should cover everything.


Me: So, you shared what you were here to learn; do you have anything else to add to that?


Freddie: No, but I really think I was here to teach the all sexual thing.


(Pause as I wait in vain for him to expound.)


Me: Do you have any regrets?


Freddie: Actually, when I look back, when I was alive, I still have a little regret for not handling my band mates with more respect.


Me: Okay. What past life affected this last life the most?


(Pause)


Jamie: Um, he’s kind of joking with Erik right now. I’m not really in the conversation with them, but they’re joking about a life where—


(Pause as Jamie eavesdrops further)


Jamie: Are you guys for real!! Just tell me if this is for real or not!

 

(Jamie giggles)


Jamie (to Erik and Freddie): You’re joking? Okay. I’m gullible! I’m gullible, I know!


Me: I am too.


Jamie: They were talking about a life of being an orangutan, and Erik and him are just slapsticking back and forth. The smell and the hair of the orangutan and what the sex is like!

 

Me (Laughing): Oh my god!


Jamie: I’m gullible. You got me, boys. So tell me a past life for real!


(Pause as Jamie listens to Freddie)

 

Jamie: He shows me this image of a blond-headed, curly, curly-haired girl. She’s probably four or five years old. Kind of still has some baby fat features, you know, round cheeks. Kind of like a blond Shirley Temple.


Me: Okay.

 

Freddie: I recall vividly in that life—

 

Jamie: I asked him, ‘Where was it’ and he shows me snow and ice that goes on forever!


(Pause)

Jamie: Oh, he jokes. He says it’s probably close to where you have your cabin. Like a Nordic region.


Me: Yeah, in Norway!

 

Freddie: I remember being told in that life that the water was hot and not to touch the water and that the ice was cold and not to be out in the cold too long. There were rules that were more about life and death to protect you and keep you safe, because it was such a harsh environment. And I remember thinking, ‘Why are they telling me this? Why can’t they just let me be?’ I just wanted to be on my own.

 

(Pause and Jamie listens more)


Jamie (to Freddie): Well that’s not a great story.

 

Me: What?

 

Jamie: He tells me what happened was that he continued to go against what his parents were saying. He had a mother, father, large family. (counting) One, two, three, four—five children. He was one of five. He’s the youngest. Doesn’t really get paid attention, can do his own thing, walks out into the snow and didn’t dress appropriately. So, he froze, died in the snow.

 

Me: Aw.


Jamie: At such a young age.

 

Me: Aw, how sad.


Freddie: I remember leaving that life, saying, ‘Why couldn’t I trust those people?’


Me: Ah!

 

Freddie: I was really hard on myself for doing that and thought, ‘Maybe some people actually do care!’

 

Me: So, maybe you learned how to trust?

 

Freddie: Well, I didn’t learn it in that life, but it definitely sat really heavy with me to listen to people in the life that I came into. And I didn’t have any outlet, musically or otherwise. It was a very bland life. So, I thought the complete opposite would satisfy me. That’s when Freddie Mercury was created.


Me: Ah! And there was nothing bland about your life as Freddie!

Part Three

Poor Freddie. Eric’s is a hard act to follow. Nevertheless…


Me: So Erik, do you have any questions for Mr. Mercury?

 

Erik: Yeah. What was Bohemian Rhapsody really about?


Freddie: What do you want it to be about?


Erik: I don’t know.


Freddie: That’s what you have to ask yourself, Erik.


Me: What was your proudest accomplishment while you were here on earth, Freddie?

 

Freddie: My music!


Me: Of course! And I suppose that hasn’t changed now that you’re in the spiritual realm, right?


Freddie: It has not at all.


Me: Okay. Any other spiritual accomplishments you’re proud of?

 

Freddie: Spiritual accomplishments?

 

Me: Yeah.


Freddie (laughing): My music!

 

Me: Oh my gosh; what am I thinking!

 

Jamie laughs.

 

Me: Now, do you have any messages for humanity, given your newfound perspective in the afterlife? Is there anything you’d like to share with the world?

 

Freddie: The only rules and regulations you have in life are the ones you create for yourself.

 

Me: That’s true. So, Erik, do you have any other questions for Freddie before we close? No orangutan questions, though!

 

Jamie (giggling): They got me good; I really thought we were going to talk about a life he had as an orangutan!

 

Me: I know! I would have fallen for that, too, hook, line and sinker!

 

Erik: What was going through your head with Bohemian Rhapsody?

 

(How persistent!)

 

Freddie (laughing): It actually came from, we called it “The Old Cowboy Song.”


Jamie: Old Cowboy Song? He’s showing me that they use to horse around and play the guitar and sing, and they called it “The Old Cowboy Song” because it started out with “Mama, I just killed a man.”

 

Me: Oh, yeah! Okay.

 

Jamie: And that just used to be lyrics in the recording studio that they would joke around with when they were warming up or whatever. And they’d all be like, “Oh, here’s Freddie as the cowboy!”

 

Freddie: So, it kind of grew into a ballad. We wondered, “How much can we fit into one song.” It became ridiculous saturated—from ballad to guitar solo to opera to heavy rock, just on and on and on.


Jamie: To otro, outro.

 

Me: Yeah, outro.

 

Jamie: What’s that?


Me: It’s the final guitar piece I guess. I’m not sure. (To my son, Lukas) Lukas, what’s an outro? Jamie wants to know.


Lukas: I don’t know.

 

Me: Okay, we’ll find out later. Stay tuned!


Jamie: Stay tuned!

 

Freddie: And once we recorded it, I thought, ‘Well, how many voices and sounds can we put on top of that?’ So, we kept dubbing and adding tracks upon tracks, layering it and layering it—our harmony times six, and our twenty-four layers turned into a lot more. And it just sounded outrageous. So our manager said, “No one in the world is ever going to play this on the radio. And we thought it would be a great little “end of the record” song, but we really had a great time creating it and recording it. Then a disc jockey—

 

Jamie (showing her youth): Oh my god, that’s what they were called back then, weren’t they?


Me: Oh, yeah.

 

Jamie (giggling): Disc Jockey! So funny!

 

Freddie: So a disc jockey got the song prematurely and started playing it late at night, and it got such great reviews that it became, you know, one of the longest played songs on the radio!

 

Me: Yeah, and one of the biggest hits.

 

Freddie: Thank you!

 

Me: I just love all of your songs.

 

Jamie: This guy has a smaller waist than I do!


Jamie and I laugh.


Me: Well, I think that’s it. I just want to thank you for all you’ve done—the joy and music that you’ve brought to the world. Thank you for your time here, too, Mr. Mercury.

 

Freddie: Your quite welcome, and I wish you all the best. Your son, Erik, is a fine young man. We’re happy to have him here.

 

Me: Aw, how nice!


(Of course inside, I’m thinking, ‘I’m not happy that he’s there. I’d rather him be with me. Sigh. In the background, Lukas asks a question.)

 

Me: What, Lukas?

 

Lukas: Is Jesus too busy to talk right now?


Me (to Jamie and Erik): He wants to know if Jesus is too busy to talk right now.

 

Me (to Lukas): Well, it’s almost the end, anyway. Do you just want to say hi to Jesus?

 

Lukas: Yes. I just wanna say hi.

 

Me: Wait, no, we’re going to channel Jesus later. Jesus is kind of busy for just a drive-by “hi and bye.” Annika, do you want to say anything to Erik? Don’t worry. You don’t have to talk on the phone.

 

Annika: Hi. (Erik can probably see her 16 year-old eye roll.)


Erik (laughing): She sounds so forced when she says it. It’s so funny!

 

(Typical teenaged girl.)


Erik: Who made waffles this morning?


Me: Oh! We got them at the Waffle House and brought them home.

 

Jamie: Erik’s really happy; he can’t wait to see Lukas in college.

 

Erik: Tell Lukas to strive to make it the entire time.

 

Me: Make it to class?

 

Erik: No, where he actually graduates and walks across the stage!


Me: Yes, exactly! He will.


Erik: I like to see everyone together.

Links:

http://channelingerik.com/channeling-freddie-mercury-part-one/

http://channelingerik.com/channeling-freddie-mercury-part-two/

http://channelingerik.com/channeling-freddie-mercury-part-three/

Categories: CELEBRITIES, METAPYSICS, SPIRITUALITY

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