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SUBSTANCE ABUSE MUCH HIGHER AMONG PEOPLE WITH PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS

Posted by SheOnAnotherLevel on June 17, 2014 at 4:10 AM

New research from the Washington University School of Medicine has revealed that compared with the general population, alcohol, tobacco and drug use is much higher among individuals who have psychotic disorders.


This is according to a study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.


The research team, including first author Dr. Sarah M. Hartz, says their research is the largest ever study that assesses substance use among populations with serious psychiatric illness.


To reach their findings, the investigators analyzed the smoking, drinking and drug use of 20,000 participants.


More than 10,000 of the participants were free of mental illness, while 9,142 had been diagnosed with either schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder (characterized by hallucinations and delusions) or mood disorders, including depression.


Among participants with mental illness, 75% were smokers 

A new study has found that alcohol, tobacco and drug use is

significantly higher in people with psychiatric disorders,

compared with the general population.



From this, the team found that 30% of participants with severe psychiatric disorders were binge drinkers - defined as consuming four servings of alcoholic beverages at one time. The researchers note that the binge drinking rate of the general population is around 8%.


The results also revealed that over 75% of participants with psychiatric disorders were regular smokers, compared with 33% of participants without mental illness.


Furthermore, around 50% of participants with mental illness demonstrated a heavy use of marijuana. Marijuana use of the general population is approximately 18%, according to the researchers.


Around 50% of participants with psychiatric illness used other illicit drugs. Recreational drug use in the general population is approximately 12%, the researchers note.


The investigators say their findings are of great concern, since people with serious psychiatric illness are more likely to die around 12-25 years earlier than individuals without mental illness.


"They don't die from drug overdoses or commit suicide - the kinds of things you might suspect in severe psychiatric illness. They die from heart disease and cancer, problems caused by chronic alcohol and tobacco use."


Patients 'need more encouragement' to curb substance use


Findings from the study also opposed previous research, revealing that factors including race and gender do not have their "typical influence" once a person develops a mental illness.


Dr. Hartz explains that when it comes to smoking, rates have decreased in the general population over the last few decades. She notes that individuals over the age of 50 are much more likely to have been regular smokers at some point during their lives, compared with younger people.


But their study findings revealed that among individuals who suffer from mental illness, the smoking rate is over 75%, regardless of their age.


Dr. Hartz says their results raise the question as to whether more focus on helping patients with mental illness to reduce their alcohol, tobacco and drug use would extend their life span.


She believes that health care professionals should "do a better job" of encouraging their mentally ill patients to stop using these substances.


"Some studies have shown that although we psychiatrists know that smoking, drinking and substance use are major problems among the mentally ill, we often don't ask our patients about those things," she says.


"We can do better, but we also need to develop new strategies because many interventions to reduce smoking, drinking and drug use that have worked in other patient populations don't seem to be very effective in these psychiatric patients."


Medical News Today recently reported on a study suggesting that drug addicts are able to quit smoking if additional therapy is offered to them.


Written by Honor Whiteman of medical news study

 


What is your take on this study and psychotic disorders?

 

Categories: HEALTHY LIVING, LOVE AND LIFE, SCIENCE

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5 Comments

Reply KarenW
9:29 PM on July 4, 2014 
I tend lean toward the explanation on this topic give by Abraham-Hicks. The mental disorder is only a causative of the real problem. Most of us when we arrive into our new bodies know our true nature and ability in all its forms since we were just spirit. Even if we did agree to forget it but when we arrive the world in which we enter into is so much more diminished because of the adults and others who then tell us what reality "really" is. This is so skewed from what we really know that some people just can't handle the difference and can't sort through it being so new and slightly confused because of forgetting most of it. ON top of it we have larger units of authority telling us it is all in our heads.
Abraham goes on to say that this causes a disconnect between our brain(the filter between this world and the next) and our real nature or our spirit. We can't handle what we know vs. what were being told. This results in some wire short circuiting in the brain and the chemistry messing up.
This is the best explanation I have seen. On top of this we can heal these metal disorders with the mind body connection. Western medicine tosses this out as non-sense by the general belief. A pill is prescribed. Take it and you feel better. Now what people don't get is that even though the medication may be needed a little while as one reconnects to their true nature it is a feat to actually be able to do this based on the traditional treatments by western medicine. Western medicine makes no money off you if you find yourself and heal. They do, however, make a ton of money keeping you on the pills as you find a "stable" place in which to view the world but never heal.
We intuitively know that were a square peg trying to fit in a round hole. What the system does is try to tell us that the round hole is actually where we should be. On top of that we should be happy about it. Seeing through the BS and finding the truth on our own through the fog of confusion and misinformation is hard work. We also have to learn to trust our selves vs. authority. That is a lot for one soul to do without guidance and being told what feels right is "wrong". So do we refuse the round hole or do we try to fit in with the benefit of a pill to make us happy about an uncomfortable space that is not right for us. Then if we do reject it we have to figure out where our square hole is that fits and how do we deal with the differential of social pressures? Whether we use prescriptions or "other" substances to help us be happy about the round hole/square peg scenario it really doesn't matter. Both methods are a way to chemically fix an underlying problem that won't resolve by any other way but healing the disconnect and being in touch with your higher self.
It is really quite the scam western medicine continues with the direction of the 'overlords".
Reply Marie <3
11:24 AM on June 18, 2014 
ABB says...
You've given a different but strong perspective to this situation Marie. I too know and have known people who had developed 'mental disorders' due to smoking or taking something that was foreign to their body at the time. Perhaps. certain drugs open up senses that we are not 'grounded' and mature enough to handle and this creates a domino effect that leads to sensory overload or 'mental' challenges? Just a thought... Like you. I do not advocate people (especially the youth) experimenting with mind altering substances in particularly. the synthetic types.... Thanks for sharing your story and its so GOOD that you are working to quit smoking altogether.


I think it was possibly a mental overload of senses. I remember the last time I projected before the breakdown and I found myself on the lower planes and it wasn't nice. I was fed on and couldn't control it. I certainly wasn't grounded as I didn't know anything about such things back then. The appointment to be diagnosed was funny enough only last year, though to me I'm more rational now then I've ever been hahaha. I'm trying my hardest Boo with giving up the tobacco...I caved and brought a pack but I'm not keeping it up, it's almost $11 a pack down here. x
Reply AstralBooBaby
10:19 AM on June 18, 2014 
Prince Alfie says...
I agree with that. Years ago I was diagnosed with severe clinical depression,. I think it was brought on by Skunk (a strain of cannabis), alcohol and other things I was experimenting with. Even though I only smoke tobacco now, I still have my down days and days where I get highly paranoid and that I believe is due to whatever is in the cigarettes I smoke (which I'm still determined to quit) and the effects on my mental health from the past. I've been to the doctors to get tested for schizophrenia, doctor agreed I might have paranoid schizophrenia...


You've given a different but strong perspective to this situation Marie. I too know and have known people who had developed 'mental disorders' due to smoking or taking something that was foreign to their body at the time. Perhaps. certain drugs open up senses that we are not 'grounded' and mature enough to handle and this creates a domino effect that leads to sensory overload or 'mental' challenges? Just a thought... Like you. I do not advocate people (especially the youth) experimenting with mind altering substances in particularly. the synthetic types.... Thanks for sharing your story and its so GOOD that you are working to quit smoking altogether.
Reply AstralBooBaby
10:11 AM on June 18, 2014 
Any 'dis-order' should be kept in its rightful perspective... In this society or matrix, if one does not think, believe, perceive, behave or decode in a way that has been 'green-lighted' based on the 'acceptable' order of things (programs set in place by the system engineers and programmers), those individuals in effect is seen or treated as having some kind of 'disorder'... Having stated this; I can really understand why those of us who are perceived or diagnosed as having some sort of 'mental disorder' tend to drink heavily, take drugs and do other forms of escapism. Its not the so called 'disorder' that causes this, it is trying to live in a world where we are 'forced' live in a social 'order' and 'structure' that we cannot or do not relate to. It is very, very, challenging for those of us who are processes light codes and reality vastly different from what we are taught or told. Many of us take drugs and drink alcohol to numb the pain of living in a world that's very uncomfortable and strange to us. We do so to escape the pressures of conformity and to stop the inner-conflict of what we feel, see and hear from a genuine place vs. what we feel, see and hear based on the 'order' that society or the matrix has in place. A very turbulent and painful existence indeed.
Reply Marie <3
2:25 AM on June 18, 2014 
I agree with that. Years ago I was diagnosed with severe clinical depression,. I think it was brought on by Skunk (a strain of cannabis), alcohol and other things I was experimenting with. Even though I only smoke tobacco now, I still have my down days and days where I get highly paranoid and that I believe is due to whatever is in the cigarettes I smoke (which I'm still determined to quit) and the effects on my mental health from the past. I've been to the doctors to get tested for schizophrenia, doctor agreed I might have paranoid schizophrenia (otherwise known as longterm psychosis) and booked an appointment but I never showed up. I fully think my problems started the moment I started smoking. Probably why I'm so against any drugs now actually. If I could take my time again, I wouldn't of started smoking full stop, let alone started smoking stupid amounts of cannabis trying to impress a bunch of 'friends' that turned out to be not my friends at all.
**THIS IS JUST MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE. I'M NOT SAYING DRUGS ARE INDEED BAD OR GOOD OR CAUSE DISORDERS**

Cool article EL :) x